Welcome to London's VW Independent Garages.We have a team of independent VW specialists who can sort out anything from basic VW servicing to advanced technical VW cars problems. One of the best independent VW Master Technician on site offering knowledge and experience using the latest VW Main Dealer garages compulsory diagnostics equipment.

VW Beetle review by Top Gear

At least now there's a good and interesting alternative to the Mini. Any euphoria with this version should last.

  • Comfort

    On normal suspension and 18-inch wheels it picked up far too many surface imperfections. You can't get the Beetle with the Golf's clever adaptive damping - well, we can't have the Beetle outperforming the halo GTI, can we?

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Performance

    You'll be able to get it with the 2.0-litre TFSI engine out of the Golf GTI, only in the Beetle it produces a slightly lower output of 197bhp and 206lb ft. Other engines will be available, from the brilliant 1.2 TSI to a 1.6 diesel with Bluemotion tech. We only got a chance to try the top 2.0-litre, but reassuringly it's still as smooth as ever. There's plenty of punch in all the gears so 0-62mph only takes 7.5secs.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Cool

    Better than before to be seen in, but still not really cool.

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Quality

    Inside, there's a nod to retro - the weird glovebox, the body-coloured dash plastic, the pulley grab handles - but mostly it's stock VW parts bin switches. Weirdly, though, some of the plastics feel cheap and that glovebox is especially poor. Flimsy stuff, and not what you expect from Volkswagen.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Handling

    The steering is more precise and, because of the wider track, there is an impressive amount of grip. But don't go thinking you'll be getting a cute Golf GTI - the Beetle doesn't have quite the precision of the Golf. It's just not as crisp.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Practicality

    The Beetle isn't practical, because the sloping tail cuts out rear seats and boot space. But at least the rear seats fold. And the cabrio doesn't lose boot space when the roof folds, because it just sits on top like a rucksack.

    Rated 4 out of 10
  • Running costs

    It's available with a 1.4-litre TSI and a 2.0-litre diesel and petrol - that diesel returns 57.6mpg and emits just 129g/km of CO2. 

    Rated 8 out of 10

 

Article source: www.topgear.co.uk

Volkswagen Passat review by Topgear

The Volkswagen Passat is a well-behaved and well-built car with lots of room and perceived quality. But it's as boring as a three-box saloon ever was.

  • Comfort

    There's plenty of space in the Volkswagen Passat and it slips down the road quietly, and this ride is the real calling card.

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Performance

    VW Group engines range from the 1.4-litre TSI to the 207bhp 2.0-litre Sport and 2.0-litre diesel with 167bhp. That last engine manages to sprint to 62mph in 8.6 seconds while still returning 61.4mpg.

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Cool

    The Passat, especially with the current generation's sightly ornate styling, is pretending but not quite managing to be classy. Not a cool place to be.

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Quality

    The old-generation Passat was famously superb in cabin quality, but this one doesn't really move the game on. Still, against increasingly over-complicated rival interiors, the Passat's classic simplicity has an appeal.

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Handling

    The Passat's road manners are respectful but a bit dull. The basic underpinnings are related to the enjoyable Golf's, but it shows its extra weight as a numbness and slight slow-wittedness.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Practicality

    The Passat saloon is big and has a bigger boot, with through-load. But there's nothing here beyond class norms.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Running costs

    A Passat will be worth more than most mainstream rivals when you trade it in, and that will shave down your running costs. Other costs, like CO2 and long-interval servicing, are more than competitive.

    Rated 7 out of 10

 

Article source: www.topgear.com

VW Up review by TopGear

It's good, the Up. Good enough that the facelifted Panda will have to have raised it's game several notches to match it, good enough to give the entire city car class a real shake up. You didn't expect any less, did you?

  • Comfort

    That smooth ride marries an interior that has been lovingly worked over: the ergonomics, seating, layout, design and texture are all top notch, and there's a genuine feeling of space inside the cabin.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Performance

    The Up gets an all-new, all-alloy three cylinder petrol engine in two flavours: 59bhp and 74bhp. It dispenses with the balancers shafts, and VW has worked hard to remove as much harshness from the three-pot as possible. The higher-spec one rumbles along with a reasonable verve, though it doesn't like to revved too much. 

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Cool

    It's simplicity should be key here, so as long as there aren't too many trinkets, yes.

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Quality

    VW city cars aren't famed for their build quality - we're looking at you, Fox - but this one feels well screwed together and lovingly crafted. 

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Handling

    A measure of handling sharpness appears to have been sacrificed for a smooth ride. Steering's a bit soft and it's not as nimble as an Aygo or as eager as James May's favourite, the Panda, but it is very polished.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Practicality

    Despite being smaller than a Panda, it's got a bigger boot (250 litres) and there's actually room for humans and their associated limbs inside, without the need for driver and passenger to become unnecessarily closely acquainted. 

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Running costs

    The 74bhp model returns 65.5mpg and both engine variants emit under 100g/km of CO2, so running this thing will be cheap. Plus, if VW can keep that entry price hovering around £8,000, the initial outlay shouldn't be too onerous either.

    Rated 5 out of 10

Article source: www.topgear.com

Volkswagen tees up new Golf for first customer orders

The seventh-generation Volkswagen Golf opens for ordering today, with prices starting below those of the previous model, at just £16,285* (RRP OTR) and rising to £24,880.

 

The latest Golf is lighter, safer, more advanced, more spacious, more efficient and better equipped than previous generations of Europe’s best-seller, of which over 29 million have been sold – some 1.6 million of these in the UK.  From launch, the Golf is available in the UK in three trim levels: S, SE and GT (GTI and BlueMotion models join the line-up in 2013).  Four petrol engines and two diesel engines are available, in either three- or five-door form. 

 

The petrol engine range starts with a four-cylinder 1.2-litre TSI unit producing 85 PS, rising via a 1.2-litre TSI 105 PS and a 1.4-litre TSI 122 PS motor to the 1.4-litre TSI 140 PS with Active Cylinder Technology, which is capable of 60.1 mpg (combined cycle) and 110 g/km (with DSG gearbox), thanks to the ability to deactivate two cylinders under light loads.

 

The diesel engines at launch are a 1.6-litre TDI 105 PS and a new 2.0-litre TDI 150 PS unit.  Both feature the latest common rail diesel technology for maximum efficiency.  All new Golf models – both diesel and petrol – come with a Stop/Start system as standard, along with battery regeneration.  Gearboxes are a mixture of five- and six-speed manuals, and six- and seven-speed DSG units, depending on the engines’ power and torque outputs.

 

All Golf models come with seven airbags, including a driver’s knee airbag, five three-point seatbelts, ABS with ESP, XDS electronic differential lock and Isofix preparation for two rear child seats.  The entry-level Composition Media system includes a 5.8-inch colour touchscreen, DAB digital radio, a CD player, MDI interface (for connecting iPod or MP3 player), Bluetooth telephone preparation and audio streaming and eight speakers.  Also standard is ‘Climatic’ semi-automatic air conditioning, among a host of other features.

 

Moving from S to SE trim brings an outstanding range of features, including standard ADC Automatic Distance Control with Front Assist and City Emergency Braking, which can even bring the vehicle to a complete halt if necessary, a Driver Alert System, PreCrash preventative occupant protection, Driver Profile Selection, rain-sensitive wipers, an automatically dimming rear-view mirror and dusk sensor (automatic driving lights). 

 

The GT model comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, front fog lights, ‘Cherry Red’ rear light clusters, heat-insulating dark-tinted rear glass, electrically foldable door mirrors with puddle lights, and front and rear parking sensors with visual display.  Inside are gloss black inserts, Alcantara and cloth sports seats, LED reading lights, ambient lighting and the Discover Navigation media system with 5.8-inch colour touchscreen.

 

Options include high beam assist, lane assist, park assist, ACC adaptive chassis control, a rear-view camera, Discover Pro navigation system with eight-inch colour touchscreen, keyless entry and a panoramic sunroof.

Volkswagen Retailers begin taking orders for the new Golf today, 19 October, with first deliveries due from the car’s official on-sale date of 7 January 2013.  For full details, see the price list.

Article source: www.volkswagen.co.uk

VW Tiguan review by TopGear

The Volkswagen Tiguan is a nicely finished and versatile family car pointlessly dressed up as an off-roader.

  • Comfort

    The interior is roomy and quiet, and the high eyepoint gives a good view out. But sacrifices have been made in order to give the Tiguan its good handling: the suspension and ride are a bit firm. Still out-rides the BMW X3 though.

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Performance

    The Tiguan has the option of three engines, a 1.4 TFSI and two 2.0 TDIs with either 138 or 168bhp. Fabulous in smaller, lighter cars such as the Golf, in this hefty SUV the 1.4 TFSI can feel underpowered despite its 150bhp. Push hard and is soon runs out of puff at the top end, so you need to change up diasppointingly early when accelerating. There's also a long delay when setting off from a standstill which is scary at a busy junction. So while its clever turbocharger plus supercharger combo has power, economy and emissions advantages, for all-out torque, the diesel is the way to go, even if the two-litre TDI 140 is slower than the TSI.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Cool

    VW isn't a proper 4x4 maker, so the Tiguan will be seen as a bit of a sham. And shams aren't cool. Not even Sham 69 were cool.

    Rated 5 out of 10
  • Quality

    The cabin is terrific - really well-designed and finished, with VW's typical high standards of build quality. However, it's all starting to look a bit samey - get behind the wheel of a Golf and you struggle to spot the difference.

    Rated 7 out of 10
  • Handling

    You never forget the height and weight of a Tiguan, but you can chuck it about a bit if the mood takes you. It steers accurately and controls body movements well, and there's traction to push you through corners whatever the weather.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Practicality

    The Tiguan is longer, wider and taller than VW's own compact seven-seat MPV, the Touran, which makes it decently spacious. Leg, head and shoulder room are all excellent front and rear, although it's a bit tight for three in the rear. The boot is generous at 1,510 litres (rear seats folded), larger than the Toyota RAV4's but smaller than the Land Rover Freelander's. However, the rear seats don't fold completely flat.

    Rated 6 out of 10
  • Running costs

    The CO2 levels are better than class-competitive if you stick with manual transmission, and servicing is on a variable schedule. But there are lots of new competitors launching, so three years away they might be in glut, which will harm residuals.

    Rated 6 out of 10

 

Article source: www.topgear.com